Topical Talk: Mapping the Territory of Digital Wellbeing Interventions

New NIDL SmallOn the 15th April at 2pm in DG10 in Bea Orpen on Dublin City University’s Glasnevin campus, Julie-Ann Sime and Chryssa Themeli from Lancaster University will give a very interesting talk as part of the NIDL’s visiting scholar series. Please do consider coming along as the talk is open to everyone!

Title: Mapping the Territory of Digital Wellbeing Interventions

Outline: We live in a highly digitally connected Europe where people of all ages use the internet to connect, communicate, explore and learn through digital media, however a recent JISC study reported that educators in Higher Education institutions are concerned about the wellbeing of their students in digital settings.   In addition, the Opening Up education report shows that 70% educators in the EU understand the importance of digital literacy but only 20-25% students are taught by digitally confident educators.  Improving the digital literacy of educators is required particularly in the area of digital wellbeing.  Higher Education institutions are becoming increasingly aware of the consequences of digital overload on mental health of individual students, the societal impacts on relationships such as cyberbullying, technical issues such as cybersecurity and the addictive design of technology, fake news and the controversies surrounding radicalisation and challenges to democracy.  The Digital Wellbeing Educators Project (funded by ERASMUS+ programme of the European Union) aims to increase the capacity of educators in Higher Education institutions to integrate digital education to promote the wellbeing of their students.  This presentation aims to raise awareness and map the territory of existing digital wellbeing interventions by showcasing some examples primarily from Europe.  The next phase of the project will see the development of an app and teacher’s digital pedagogy toolkit to support educators in developing their own digital competences and making their teaching more digital.

3665.jpgDr. Julie-Ann Sime, Lancaster University

Julie-Ann is an educational researcher and a pioneer of online distance learning who has been teaching online for 25 years. She researches into the use of new technologies in teaching and learning in professional contexts, including: use of video for reflection, game-based learning and team training of professionals in 3D virtual worlds. She is co-editor of a new book on Networked Learning: Reflections and Challenges (2018).

8829.jpgDr. Chryssa Themeli, Lancaster University

Chryssa is an educational researcher focusing on research that changes practice and thinking, teaching that transforms people’s lives and engages actively with students, businesses and communities. As research assessor, she evaluates UKERI proposals for the British council and European Union proposals for H2020 FET Innovation Launchpad Calls.

A Day of Talks with Handful of Spaces Still Available to Join a Conversation with Professor Paul Prinsloo

unnamedOn the 8th April 2019 the NIDL is hosting a number of events. The first is an all-day Learning Design Cross Institutional Network, a professional network which is led by Simon Walker, Head of Educational Development at Greenwich University. As part of this event Gabi Witthaus will give a talk on:

“Knowledge Exchange on Open and Distance Learning for Refugees in Higher Education”

This session is very appropriate given that Dublin City University (DCU) was Ireland’s first University of Sanctuary and continues to develop both online and campus-based initiatives for refugees and asylum seekers. Unfortunately at this stage the all-day workshop is full but we do have a handful of spaces still available for this follow up event.

NIDL Visiting Scholar Series

Paul Prinsloo.jpgWe are delighted that in the early evening on April 8th Professor Paul Prinsloo from University of South Africa (UNISA) has agreed to give a talk on the topical issue of using student data. Paul is a Research Professor in Open and Distance Learning (ODL) in the College of Economic and Management Sciences at UNISA. His academic background includes fields as diverse as theology, art history, business management, online learning, and religious studies. His current research focuses on the collection, analysis and use of student data in learning analytics, graduate supervision and digital identity.

Title: Using Student Data to Inform Design and Pedagogy: Some Pointers

Abstract: 

Higher education has always collected, analysed and used student data for a variety of purposes e.g., reporting, strategic planning and operational resource allocation. Due to the increasing digitisation and institutionalisation of online learning, as well as advances in technology, analytics tools and software, higher education institutions now have access to more (volume) student data than ever before. We also have access to more nuanced data (granularity and variety) as well as the increasing possibility to collect real-time behavioural data and provide feedback and intervene in real-time. The year 2011 saw the emergence of learning analytics “the measurement, collection, analysis and use of student data for purposes of understanding and optimising learning and the environments in which it occurs.” Since 2011, learning analytics as research focus but also as field of practice matured and continue to provoke discussions and research pertaining to its impact not only on student success and retention, but increasingly also in shaping resource allocation, learning design and pedagogy. While evidence of the impact of learning analytics on improving student success is varied and often context-specific, there is increasing interest how student data can be used to inform learning design and pedagogy. In this presentation I would like to provoke some discussion surrounding some of our assumptions pertaining to student data before mapping evidence of how student data can inform learning design and pedagogy. I hope to conclude by locating the collection, analysis and use of student data to inform learning design and pedagogy in the nexus of ethics, responsibility and care.

Where: Q303/Q304 Business School, Dublin City University, Glasnevin Campus

When: 5:30pm Monday, 8th April 2019, followed by networking and light refreshments

Registration

As the number of seats available for Paul’s talk is limited and to assist us with catering requirements, it is essential that you register for this event. There will be a wait list should additional seats become available. Click on the following link to meet Paul and join us for this talk…

https://nidl-visiting-scholar.eventbrite.ie

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